Know Your Bible: Error In the Book of Hebrews

As a former Christian, all of the errors and misquotes I have found were while using my Christian Bible (old and new testaments). I did not go to some random special resource to discover this fraud. Look up these verses to see it for yourself in your own Bible.

Here in Hebrews 10 compared to Psalm 40 we can see several errors. Not only did the author intentionally replace God’s word, which it is a sin to add or subtract from Scripture (Deuteronomy 4:2; 12:32/13:1; Jeremiah 26:2), by subtracting the text “My ears you have opened” and replaced it with “But a body You have prepared for Me..” in attempts to deceive the unsuspecting reader into thinking Jesus’ body was the final sacrifice, but in addition to this blatant alteration of God’s Scripture, the author of Hebrews, presumably Paul, removed “You did not require” and replaced it with “you had no pleasure” to further his agenda.

As discussed in my article “Why Jesus Didn’t Die For Anyone’s Sins”, sin and trespass offerings can only transpire in the temple within Jerusalem, which no longer exists, nor existed at the time the psalm was penned; moreover, those offerings are designed to be a tangible lesson to learn God’s instructions of loving Him and others as they were exclusively for unintentional/accidental sins, not rebellion or intentional sin. When a temple is not present or should the offender be not in Jerusalem, sin and trespass offerings are not required for the remission of sins despite what Christian doctrines purport. We see in 1 Kings 8, King Solomon prays and declares that even when no temple is present or people are not in the land of Israel, God will forgive those who repent and return to His Torah. In other words, all God has ever wanted was for people to hear His documented voice, being His instructions on how to love God and others throughout the Torah; hence, the psalmist praise of “my ears you have opened”. God eagerly forgives those who repent and return to His instructions. As Scripture reveals and repeats in numerous places, all God wants is those with circumcised hearts, willing to listen, trust, and obey (see 1 Kings 8, Psalm 50, 51, 103, 119, Proverbs 3, Isaiah 1:16-17, and many more!). As if all of these intentional and deceptive misquotes weren’t bad enough, the author of Hebrews also left off a key element validating God’s Torah by removing the phrase, “And Your law is within my heart.”

Furthermore, we see in a future era, sin and trespass offerings, as well as other sacrifices, and all of Torah, will resume in God’s presence once the final temple is erected (see Ezekiel 40:38-43; 43:4-46:24; Zechariah 14:16+; Isaiah 56:6-8; Isaiah 2:3).

These errors are clearly intentional as the author of Hebrews is leading the reader to believe 1) A sin blood sacrifices were required (for atonement), 2) God doesn’t want ongoing sacrifices, but just one final sacrifice being Jesus now and 3) by leaving off Torah is within my heart it leads the reader to believe God’s laws are done away with or no longer relevant, a myth the Church has propagated for centuries in attempts to distance themselves from anything remotely Jewish. The author of Hebrews goes on to repeat his grave sin by rewriting it for emphasis in verses 8-9 AND claiming God’s Torah, part of what Christians label “OLD” Testament is removed. Out with the old and in with the new Hebrews 10:9 claims; hence, the birth of Replacement Theology. However, Deuteronomy 13 warns us that anyone that comes along and says God’s law, His Torah, His instructions, His voice is done away with, or steers others to not obey Torah is a false prophet and in dangerous error. This person or doctrine was sent as a test to see if you believe in God or man-made doctrines like Replacement Theology and the Book of Hebrews. Fascinating that the author could not even pen his name to this manuscript just as the alleged authors of the Gospels did not pen their names either.

Know Your Bible | False Prophets |What Does the Bible Really Say About Circumcision & Sacrifices?

If circumcision is irrelevant according to Paul (Galatians 5:11 and 6:15), why is it a mandatory expression of worship in the future for both Jew and Gentile should they wish to enter God’s sanctuary/presence (see Ezekiel 44:5-9)?

Likewise, if Jesus is the “final sacrifice” as the author of Hebrews purports (presumably Paul), why are sacrifices reinstated in worship in the future final Temple AFTER the “day of the LORD” (Zechariah 14; Ezekiel 40-46)?

#knowyourBible #FalseProphets

To learn more about how to discern between true and false prophets, click this link for an in-depth Bible Study.

How To Study the Bible

The Bible has many mysteries just awaiting to be solved. One mystery unlocks another and so forth all revealing more and more of God. Here are some ways I found particularly helpful when seeking truth in the Bible.

1. Have an open mind; forget what you were told certain passages mean and simply let Scripture interpret itself.

2. Be willing to be wrong about what you think you know.

3. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Write your question(s) down or whatever topic you are interested in.

4. Be a Bible Detective. Get a concordance and look up every time that word/subject/topic is mentioned in the Bible. How do those verses define that word/concept/subject?

5. Take copious notes on what you discover with supporting Scripture. Put it into an essay or article..write it out or speak it to help you process and summarize what you discovered.

6. Be a Bible attorney. Build a case both for and against such concept using evidence of various Scripture, then make a judgment based on the evidence. For example, when I went to build a case to prove Jesus is Messiah while still a Christian, that is when the case against Jesus being Messiah mounted with overwhelming and dissapointing evidence.

7. Be a Profiler. Using the Hebrew Bible, make a list of clues and criteria of a type of role such as the profile of a prophet, profile of a messiah, profile of a priest, etc.

8. Enjoy the blessings in what you discover and share with others.

Was the New Testament Inspired by God or Rome?

Every good Christian knows, the New Testament has many parallels or typology to the Old Testament. Christians believe the New Testament is inspired by the Holy Spirit and is the inerrant word of God. Many passages found in the New Testament seemingly quote the Old Testament, although, after careful-study, most of these quotes have been altered, out of context, or just plain in error unbeknown to the average Christian. Nevertheless, it is common for Christians to notate the parallels of both the Old and New Testament to explain and prove the New Testament must be inspired by the Holy Spirit. But what if that same method of typology could prove that the New Testament wasn’t inspired by God, but rather, inspired by the Emperors of Rome, who believed they were God?

While still identifying as a Christian and after my quest to thoroughly study the prophets of the Hebrew Bible as well as the Messianic prophecies, I found myself questioning the legitimacy of the New Testament. I penned an article with my questions and findings, which you can read here. During that period of my research, I found it alarming to discover the gospels were written not just several decades after Jesus allegedly lived and died, but last of all the New Testament books. Like many Christians, I suppose I assumed the books of the New Testament were written in chronological order. Upon discovering the Gospels were written last, I found it doubtful the disciples of Jesus would be alive numerous decades later, or could accurately recall events a plethora of years earlier, and suspicious none of them scribed their names to any of the gospels, not to mention the gospels are written in Greek, not Hebrew/Aramaic, the would-be language of Jesus’ alleged disciples. Nor did I understand why such critical documents if they indeed are the word of God would be written in Greek when all of the Hebrew Bible is written in Hebrew and the prophets state in Zephaniah 3:9 the pure language (of Hebrew) will one day be restored (to the entire world) so all people will know and be able to call on the name of God (inferring the Jews already know the name of the LORD and how to call upon Him and it is in Hebrew, not Greek). Since then, in addition to realizing Jesus does not fit the criteria of a messiah according to the Hebrew Bible, I stumbled upon an interview of a prosecuting attorney, who authored a book called Creating Christ: How Roman Emperors Invented Christ. Consequently, I purchased and read the detailed book, which prompted me to research Roman history from that period. Indeed, this author, as well as others such as Joseph Atwill’s Caesar’s Messiah provide compelling and overwhelming evidence that the Gospels, in particular, but also the Book of Acts may have been inspired by the Flavian Dynasty and penned, at least in part, by Josephus, the captive and apostate Jewish historian for the Flavians.

In the approximate 300 pages of the thought-provoking book, Creating Christ, the authors compiled over 30 years of their compelling research presenting the strong possibility and uncanny parallels of events that transpired between Emperor Vespasian, born as Titus Flavius Vespasianus, and his son, Emperor Titus, collectively known as the “Flavian Dynasty”, and the eerily similar accounts of God the Father and God the Son duo found in the Gospels. The Father-Son duo of Vespasian and Titus acted in unity to win the affection of the eclectic people of the Roman Empire while promoting syncretism of numerous cultures and faiths throughout the Empire as well as the concept of “peace on earth”, all the while quelling and conquering anyone who rebelled like the Torah-observant, militant Jews of Judea-specifically, in Jerusalem. Titus, in particular, was deified, meaning made himself into an official god-in-the-flesh, and even presented himself as the Jewish Messiah. According to the historical research presented throughout the book, the goal of Rome was to convince the non-compliant Jews to compromise their faith and identity and submit to the hybrid of many known beliefs throughout the Roman Empire, which eventually became known as Christianity. Additionally, the authors prove how several turn-coat Jews denied their faith and heritage and not only aided the Flavians and the Roman army in seizing control of Jerusalem as well as the temple in 70 A.D., but then the traitorous Jews, having been armed with Torah scrolls, likely drafted propaganda quoting Jewish Scriptures to help convince zealous Jews they ought to worship, submit, and serve the Roman Emperor and join his imperial cult. One such traitorous Jew was Josephus, who perhaps to save his own neck upon being captured prophesized Vespasian would be Emperor. In time, Josephus became adopted by the Flavians and was richly rewarded as he recorded the events of the Flavian Dynasty. Fascinatingly enough, both the authors of Creating Christ and Caesar’s Messiah report several common themes found in the Gospels and Josephus’ documentation of the Flavians such as Josephus documented Vespasian and Titus performed miracles such as spitting in their hands and healing the blind (John 9:6) or feeding a plethora of people, or how Titus was 33 when he made his triumphant entry into Jerusalem, and it was 40 years later he destroyed the Jewish Temple, or how Vespasian was short and his father was a tax collector (like Zacchaeus in Luke 19:2-3), all similar parallels to what the Gospels report pertaining to Jesus and his interactions. Similarly, there are some parallels of Josephus’ life woven into the Gospels such as three of his friends were crucified, but one was revived similar to how Jesus was allegedly crucified alongside two others but was “resurrected” aka revived. Additionally, Romans, including their Emperors, were known to be quite debaucherous while the Jesus of the Gospels is persuading the Torah-observant Jews to overlook adultery when a woman was caught (see John 8), not to mention Jesus encouraged his followers to be sure to pay their taxes imposed by Emperor Vespasian (because they were Jewish)-(see Matthew 22). Other modern scholars authored books, such as Caesar’s Messiah and Operation Messiah, and also detailed various parallels or typology between various stories of the Gospels as well as the Book of Acts and the Flavians or other Emperors throughout Roman history. Moreover, it is known by scholars that the earliest writings of the Gospels were penned during or shortly after this Flavian era, several decades after Jesus allegedly lived and died. In other words, scholars are conveying the Gospels and even parts of the Book of Acts, are likely to be fables inspired by various acts of Emperors as well as weaving in both Jewish and Greek culture into the New Testament to synchronize and unify the various faiths throughout the Empire into a one-world-religious-Roman-order.

Additionally, it is a known fact the New Testament has interpolations, meaning added phrases and additions, to support man-made church doctrine (such as the trinity). Similarly, the one and only brief historical reference regarding a “Jesus” in that era was written by the turn-coat Josephus and even that is disputed as an interpolation (added later). The name Jesus was a popular name and is even found in the Talmud describing different people of different eras. Nevertheless, let’s say, an actual “Jesus” may have existed in the 1st Century A.D. Perhaps he was a type of peace-loving Reform Jew and Rabbi, who gained some Jewish followers. What if Rome, having liked what they heard about Jesus, opted to expand on and fabricate the Jewish Jesus to their benefit in order to quell militant Jews and gain their allegiance? Such a concept is not far fetched when one studies the great lengths Emperors of Rome or the Roman Catholic Church would do to elevate themselves and their ideologies – just study how Caligula, an Emperor prior to to the Flavian Era, made some of his own soldiers appear to be British captives while parading his alleged prisoners through the streets of Rome to make the people think Caligula conquered Brittania when he hadn’t. Or how several centuries later, post-Flavian era, the Roman Catholic Church re-purposed the pagan festival of Saturnalia and called it Christmas in order to convert more pagans. It doesn’t take much research to discover, Rome has a long documented history of marketing propaganda to achieve their purposes of unity, power, and control.

Furthermore, Valliant and Fahy, authors of Creating Christ, extract details often overlooked by Christians or former Christians, including myself, within the Gospels and the Book of Acts highlighting how Jews are constantly painted as evil whereas Rome is portrayed as fair, reasonable, and honorable mediators, who ought to be trusted and obeyed. The authors also extract the Apostle Paul’s writings of notable imperial people listed throughout the New Testament to suggest the Apostle Paul was aiding Rome in relaying their propaganda. For example, in Philippians 2:25-30, Paul sings the praises of Epaphroditus and implored the people of Philippi to embrace him. Epaphroditus was the Roman Secretary or Administrator, who helped Nero, an earlier Emperor, commit suicide, as well as served the Flavians. In other words, Epaphroditus was an elite in the Roman court and evidently, buddies with Paul. Josephus also wrote about Epaphroditus and their great comradery as former religious Jews who both served the Roman Empire, specifically the Flavians. Paul seems to also be one of the persuaded, former religious Jews who purported the Roman Empire’s goal of synchronism as he emulated Torah’s criteria of a false prophet in Deuteronomy 13 and instead convinced (and still convinces) his readers to abandon Torah (Book of Galatians) and submit to Rome (Romans 13). Notice Paul writes in the closing of his letter to the Philippians (of the Roman Empire) in Philippians 4:22, “All the saints greet you, but especially those who are of Caesar’s household.” inferring he is well acquainted with those close to Caesar, if not Caesar himself. Hence, dropping names like Epaphroditus. Perhaps this is why Paul insisted Caesar hear his case in Acts 25:10-12. (Note: Caesar is a title meaning Emperor derived from the days of Julius Caesar)

In summary, while I wouldn’t necessarily agree with everything conveyed in the book, the authors of Creating Christ provide an overwhelming amount of evidence, even much not discussed in this article, to create a reasonable doubt to the authenticity of a historical Jesus as described in the Gospels while supporting the likelihood that the Gospels may have been inspired by acts of Vespasian, Titus, and other Roman Emperors, as well as the urgent need to quell Torah-observant, religious, militant Jews in addition to hybridizing various religious beliefs of Greeks and Jews into a one-world-order of the Roman Empire.

Regardless of how the New Testament came about and progressed into the most popular religion of our day, it was evident to me prior to reading these books, the New Testament is not inspired by God, but was allowed by God as a test (Deuteronomy 13). As for me, I will stick to the Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible, and serve only the God of Israel, not the god or opinion of Rome or any other.

Shalom and blessings!

Carrie Turner

Profile of a Prophet: How To Discern Between a True and False Prophet

In recent years, while on my peculiar faith journey learning to listen and lean on God, I thoroughly studied the prophets of the Hebrew Bible to help me understand prophecy and to discern between true and false prophets. I was experiencing many unexplainable and seemingly prophetic occurrences, which I attributed to God’s Spirit moving on my life and directing my steps, all of which prompted me to explore such concepts in the Bible. In the ancient days, the Hebrew Bible reveals there were numerous true prophets as well as false ones (1 Kings 19:14-18; 2 Chronicles 18:5). If God doesn’t change as the prophet Malachi proclaims (Malachi 3:6) and does nothing without revealing it to His prophets first as the prophet Amos says (Amos 3:7), it is likely God indeed still speaks though His revelation may be less common like it was reported in the days of Samuel’s early life (1 Samuel 3:1). Consequently, unlike most branches of Judaism today who believe God stopped speaking after the prophet Malachi, I believe God still speaks and there are still true prophets today. As a former Christian, I also studied the New Testament as it reports various prophets, namely John the Baptist, Jesus, Paul, and a few others. Due to these reports of prophets and apostles, some sects of Christianity breed a plethora of false prophets. These variables prompted me to investigate the prophets of the Hebrew Bible to discern who is a true prophet and who is a false prophet in both the New Testament as well as in modern day life. We can glean much from a careful study of the Hebrew Bible, the foundation for which all theological concepts must be judged by.

Note: The Scriptures listed below do not capture all the appropriate verses that could be applied to said concepts, but they are an extensive list for readers to research and reflect on.

  1. A true prophet will acknowledge the One True Living God, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the God of Israel and Him alone. Exodus 3:6,15-18; Judges 5:1-3; Isaiah 43:10-11; 44:6; 45:21-22; Jeremiah 11:1-3; Hosea 13:4. Be aware even some false prophets acknowledge the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and can even accurately hear/see things of God, such as Balaam (Numbers 22-24; 31:8); nevertheless, all the following criteria should be measured when discerning who is and isn’t a prophet/prophetess of God.
  2. A true prophet will not just be all about serving the One True Living God, but they will also be all about His way, being Torah, also known as God’s instructions, to hit the mark, or God’s laws/commands. Deuteronomy 13 warns that if a prophet comes along and instructs you to worship another god or worship another as if they are God (like Jesus), do away with God’s commands as Paul teaches in his letter to the Galatians, follow another voice such as Jesus’ or Paul’s voice, etc., then you will know they are a false prophet. That same text says even if the prophecy manifests or some miracle is performed and they use that to convince you to worship, follow, serve, listen to, trust and obey anything other than what God’s Voice already said in His documented Voice, being Torah, you will know they are a false prophet. When one studies the prophets of the Hebrew Bible, it is glaringly obvious they all beckon their audience to repent and return to the One True Living God and His Torah, which is His Voice, His instructions for how to live (Deuteronomy 28:1+; Genesis 26:5). Furthermore, Scripture reveals false prophets can indeed perform signs and wonders such as the ones that battled Moses for Pharaoh’s decision (Exodus 7:11, 22), but it does not mean you ought to believe their message. Should you come across an alleged prophet, whether in written text or in person, it will behoove you to discover if the alleged prophet or teacher is for or against God’s law/instructions/commands, all synonyms for Torah, as it will be a huge clue to aid your discernment. 1 Samuel 7:3; 12:14-15,20-25; 13:13-14; 15:22-24; 1 Kings 8; 1 Kings 18:36-40; 2 Kings 17:13-23; 2 Kings 22:14-20; 2 Chronicles 34:21-33; Isaiah 30; Jeremiah 9:12-16; 10:1-16; Jeremiah 11:1-7; 16:10-12; Ezekiel 3; 11:19-21; 33; 36:26-28; Daniel 9:4-13; Hosea 4:6; 9:17; 14:9; Amos 2:4; Jonah 3:3-10; Malachi 2:5-9
  3. A true prophet will be called by God and or receive instructions through typically a vision or dream versus their own wishful thinking. Consequently, God’s prophets were called “Seers”. If you evaluate all the prophets of the Bible, the LORD spoke to the vast majority of them through a vision, dream, or some type of visual experience. Numbers 12:6; Genesis 15:1; 17:1; 26:2; 31:10-13; 32:22-32; 37:1-36; 40-42; Exodus 3:2-6; Judges 5:12; 1 Samuel 3:3-15,21; 9:3,19 ; 2 Samuel 7:4,17; 24:11; 1 Kings 3:5,15; 9:2; 2 Kings 17:13; 2 Chronicles 7:12; 2 Chronicles 9:29; 2 Chronicles 16:7,10 ; 2 Chronicles 26:5; Isaiah 1:1; 2:1, 13:1; 30:9-11; Jeremiah 1:11-13; Ezekiel 1:4, 28; Daniel 7:1; 8:1,15; 9:20-21; Hosea 12:10,13; Amos 1:1; 3:7; 7:1,4,12; 8:1-2; Obadiah 1:1; Micah 1:1; Nahum 1:1; Habakkuk 1:1; 2:2; Zechariah 1:8; 2:1
  4. A true prophet does NOT want to be a prophet. Whereas, a false prophet promotes themselves and their status as a prophet, their merchandise, their books, etc. True prophets are hated, persecuted, isolated, lonely, and usually killed not to mention, carry the burden of the prophecy itself. A false prophet wants to be a prophet for fame, respect, power, and control. True prophets are humble, often isolated (especially when being called by God and refined before ministering), often lowly in position, seem peculiar or different from the world (think of David and Amos how they were just shepherds of no status or Moses hanging out in a desert). False prophets want the glory and strive to be popular. They often are flashy, showy, performance driven, and driven by money. They often prophesy about their follower’s material possessions versus a person developing a heart that actively seeks God. Jeremiah 1:6-10; 20:7-10; Daniel 6; Amos 7:14-15; Habakkuk 1:1-4; Nahum 1:1; Jonah 1-2; Micah 2-3
  5. A true prophet will be sent by God (usually to leaders, but also to lands, and individuals not in authority). Genesis 37-42 (Joseph forcibly sent) ; Exodus 3; 1 Kings 17:3,9; 18:1; Jonah 1 (Jonah forcibly sent); Isaiah 7; Amos 7:14-15; Jeremiah 2:1; 4:5; 5:1; 7:2; 11:2; 18:2; 26:2; Daniel 1-2 (Daniel forcibly sent); Haggai 1:1, 12
  6. A true prophet will most likely tell you what you NEED to hear, not what you WANT to hear. Hence, why the prophet was sent in the first place. Whereas, a false prophet will be all about telling you want sounds good to you. They can read the idols of your heart and therefore, tell you what your heart desires making you like them and that word. A true prophet’s message will be about cultivating a circumcised heart, open to relationship with God, serving Him with your whole heart, walking in God’s Torah, and not nearly as concerned about material fleshly things. Although a true prophet may at times provide an encouraging positive word if that is what God tells them you NEED to hear, it will more likely be a message of repentance, warning, or judgment. What I call a “Reflect. Correct. Direct.” type of message. Be leery of prophets who give you words of ‘peace and prosperity’ than prophets who correct or warn you. Always analyze the overall message though – does it point your heart towards repentance? 1 Kings 18:16-19; 22; 2 Kings 20:1; 2 Kings 22:14-20; 1 Chronicles 17:1-5; 2 Chronicles 16:7-10; 2 Chronicles 25:15-16; 2 Chronicles 28:9-15; 2 Chronicles 36:15-16; Isaiah 38:1; Jeremiah 2; 5:15-18; 10:1-25; 12:17; 13:9-10; 14-15; 22:1-5; 23:9-40; 28:1-1-29:32; Ezekiel 2; 13-14; Hosea 8:1-3,8; 11:5; 13:4; Nahum 1-3
  7. A true prophet will be all about “REPENT & RETURN, Serve the LORD.” whereas a false prophet will be all about “RECEIVE & REJOICE, The LORD serves you!” Again, a true prophet is less concerned about your worldly goods or fleshly things and will be focused on the issues of your heart that need aligning to Abba Father and His Word first and foremost. 2 Samuel 12; 1 Kings 20:35-43; 2 Chronicles 12:1-12; 2 Chronicles 16:3-17; Isaiah 55:6-7; Isaiah 56:1; Jeremiah 4:1-4; 13:9-10; 18:1-11; 23:9; 23:9-40; Jeremiah 18:19; 28; 31:21-22; Ezekiel 14; 16; 18:30-32; 20:7-32; Daniel 9:4-13; Hosea 4:6; 6:1-3; Joel 2:12-14; Amos 4:6-13; 5:4, 14-15; Jonah 3; Micah 6:8; Zephaniah 2:3; Zechariah 1:3-4; Malachi 2:5-9; 3:6-7; 4:4-6
  8. A true prophet will tell you a very specific word from the LORD. 1 Samuel 3:11-21; 1 Samuel 10; 2 Samuel 7:4-17; 2 Samuel 24:11-25; 1 Kings 17:8-9; 21:17-24; 2 Kings 3:15-4:7; 2 Kings 5:10; 2 Kings 19:2,5-7,20-37; Isaiah 7-11; 41-46 (notice Isaiah in chp 45 predicts a Gentile King named Cyrus will help restore the temple after the Babylonian captivity of Jews-See Daniel 9 predicts the same thing/compare to Ezra 1); 48-56; 60-62; 65-66; Jeremiah 6; 16; 29-33 (notice in 29:10 Jeremiah predicted Jews would be in Babylonian captivity 70 years, which indeed manifested/Daniel 9:2); 50:4-5; 51:1-6; Ezekiel 9-12; 34-48; Daniel 11-12; Hosea 3:4-5; Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Micah 4-5; Zephaniah 1-3; Haggai 1; Zechariah 12-14
  9. A true prophet’s prophecy  will probably** manifest whereas a false word will fall to the ground (fail). Deuteronomy 18:18-22; 1 Samuel 3:19; Jeremiah 18:1-11; 28:9.

**Please note!

IF the prophecy manifests, that could be a very good indication it is of the LORD. UNLESS, the overall message of that prophet is telling you to reject God’s Torah/Law, serve the idols of your heart, worship another god (like Jesus), obey man’s doctrines (like Paul’s), or be all about more worldly things (like most modern prophets) versus the One True Living God and His ways, His laws, His will!! THIS IS A TEST FROM GOD. Deuteronomy 12:32-13:10

IF the prophecy does NOT manifest, that could be due to a few reasons:

  1. It came from the so-called prophet’s/person’s heart (imagination) not God. Jeremiah 23:16-17
  2. The person/prophet added to or subtracted from the word itself. Deuteronomy 12:32; Jeremiah 26:2
  3. The people repented or disobeyed, depending on if the prophecy was a call to repentance (much more common) or a prosperous prophecy (very rare), and so it was a prophecy conditioned on the response of the people. Book of Jonah; Jeremiah 18:1-11

The end goal of all true prophets who prophesy repentance, warning, and judgment is that the prophecy NOT manifest for that means the people repented. Jeremiah 18:1-11. Jonah, for example, was a successful prophet, because the Gentiles/ Ninevites repented and avoided devastation. Then again, a successful prophet is also one who is obedient in giving the word of the LORD. It is not the job of the prophet to get or somehow manipulate the people to receive the word; it is merely his/her job to deliver the message.

With these criteria, I encourage you to carefully consider and judge those who may have been said to have been a prophet in the writings of the New Testament as well as modern-day prophets or alleged prophets of old. People like Saint Paul, Emperor Constantine, Joseph Smith, David Koresh, and many others have had mystical visual experiences, myself included, some have claimed to be prophets, but how do they measure up as a prophet according to the criteria we studied above? Based off the criteria of the Hebrew Bible, the vast majority of today’s prophets are false as were the ones of days gone by; additionally, the alleged prophets of the New Testament have proven they are false considering they all encouraged their audience to worship the man, Jesus, as God and most, especially Paul, encouraged God’s Torah to be ignored (that is assuming such characters actually existed to begin with and the stories written about them are indeed how they presented themselves).

Prophets, both then and now, are sent by God as a test. Learn to discern.

Updated January 2021

FAQ

Throughout this flip-flopped faith journey, many questions have probed not just my mind, but the minds of others. These frequently asked faith questions may help you understand my outlook on this journey as well as challenge yours. Many shalom and blessings as you continue to seek the One True God with all your being!

Who is a Jew?

The term “Jew” comes from Judah as in the tribe of Judah. Jacob, the grandson of Abraham, had twelve sons from various women and each son, such as Judah, became a tribe (Genesis 35:23-26). Years later, due to many rebelling and worshiping pagan gods, the twelve tribes had a family feud and split into two kingdoms in the land of Israel/Canaan (1 Kings 11-12). The Northern Kingdom was comprised of ten tribes while the Southern Kingdom was primarily comprised of the tribe of Judah, but also the tribe of Benjamin, as well as the Levites. Some from the Northern Kingdom relocated to the Southern Kingdom when it became apparent the Northern Kingdom was becoming increasingly rebellious against God’s laws and also worshiping other gods. Eventually, despite prophets like Isaiah warning them to repent, the Northern Kingdom was taken into captivity by the Assyrians and assimilated into the nations never to be regathered again (until a future time unfulfilled just yet, according to Ezekiel 37). Meanwhile, the Southern Kingdom, which evolved into being known as Jews, has withstood not only the Babylonian captivity, but persecutions throughout human history. Despite the never ending oppression and persecution of Jews, they constantly overcome proving God is real as He keeps His eternal covenants.

Interestingly, Abraham, known as the father of the Jews, was not technically Jewish, but rather came from a pagan religion. However, he was called or chosen by God to leave all that he knew to follow God (Genesis 12). Overtime, God revealed more of Himself and His ways to Abraham and his descendants, particularly when they sojourned the wilderness for 40 years. For example, the first instruction God introduced to the Israelites was the importance of resting on Sabbath (see Exodus 16). Equally fascinating is how some Egyptians or those of other religions abandoned all that they knew to enjoin themselves to Israel. Various Scriptures reveal anyone who enjoined themselves with Israel for whatever reason were to also obey the terms of the covenant and were just as blessed (Exodus 12:37-38, 49; Leviticus 18:26; Numbers 14:24,15:13-16,26-31; Ruth 4:11-22; Isaiah 56; Ezekiel 47:21-23, as a few examples).

Like Abraham, others throughout the Bible such as Caleb (Numbers 32:11-12, 14:24) and Ruth (Ruth 1), were not born Jewish, but committed themselves to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as well as His ways and therefore, are considered Jewish, or what Judaism refers to as “Jews-By-Choice”. Similarly, Isaiah 56 repeatedly refers to foreigners or those not born as Jews or natural Israelites, but choose to enjoin themselves with God, His covenant, and His people, as “better than sons and daughters”. In other words, according to Isaiah 56, and the accounts of Abraham, Caleb, and Ruth, those who are not born into God’s family, but are adopted in, are regarded in high-esteem in God’s opinion. Who chose who? Did us Gentiles choose God or did God not only chose the Israelites, but also the foreigners or strangers to join them?

What are Jews “chosen” for? Chosen to do what exactly?

Scripture tells us the Israelites, who later evolved into being known as Jews, were not chosen because they were great or mighty, but rather just the opposite (Deuteronomy 7:6-11). He chose them because they were small in number, not because of their virtues (Deuteronomy 9:3-5), but more importantly, because He made a promise to their ancestor, Abraham. Moreover, the Israelites/Hebrews, now known as Jews, were chosen to be keepers and teachers of Torah showing the world the way of salvation (Isaiah 42, 49). They were chosen to be the light as they both learn and teach the world how God defines light. Not only is Torah defined as light (Psalm 119:105-106; Proverbs 6:23), the way/path/sacred highway (Psalm 119:1,3,15-16,27,30,33,35; Proverbs 6:23; Isaiah 35:8-10), righteousness (Deuteronomy 6:25; Isaiah 26:8-9), eternal (Psalm 119:160), and so on, but it defines how God wants us to love Him and others for they are all about loving God and or loving others. Eventually, the world not only gravitates to Jews (Zechariah 8), the world/nations/Gentiles realize they inherited lies (Jeremiah 16:9), but also the world “learns righteousness” (Isaiah 26:8-10) as Torah is taught (Isaiah 2; Micah 4; Ezekiel 44) and enforced (Zechariah 14:16+; Ezekiel 44). Jews are chosen to lead in love as they both be and teach the light to the dark world, though some Jews are unaware of such a calling, sadly.

Have you officially converted and if so, what denomination of Judaism do you associate with?

It may surprise some Christians to learn Judaism has several different denominations and movements within Judaism. As a former Christian, I found that a bit daunting trying to discern what the different branches, denominations, or movements believed and why. In fact, I am still learning new perspectives from the different denominations. I have found it interesting and frustrating that some seem to add to God’s Torah making more commandments while others disregard God’s commandments found in Torah something God specifically said not to do in Deuteronomy 13:1 (or Deuteronomy 12:32 if you have a Christian Bible). Nevertheless, I have gleaned valuable insight from all the denominations and still listen to, watch, or read materials from a variety of Jewish sources and denominations within Judaism. If I had to label myself by a particular denomination or Jewish movement it might be Karaite, the minority within the minority, with Renewal or Reform style of music. More importantly, I strive to follow God’s instructions found in Torah and reiterated or demonstrated in other Biblical texts such as the prophets, psalms, proverbs, etc. Technically, I have not converted to any form of Judaism as conversion as it is known today is more or less a man-made process whereas the Tanakh doesn’t detail a conversion process other than committing oneself to God’s terms found in the covenant and circumcision. As a woman, circumcision does not apply to me, but I have committed myself to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and uphold the terms of the covenant to the best of my ability. Therefore, in God’s eyes, I have converted though not necessarily according to man’s standards.

Do you believe Gentiles are only obligated to adhere to the Noahide Laws?

I have written a detailed article with a plethora of Scripture explaining my understanding of Scripture regarding obeying God’s commands, whether Jewish or Gentile. Essentially, considering I believe Scripture reveals the purpose of a Jew is chosen to teach Torah to the world, I believe God’s instructions are for everyone. Jews are simply commissioned to lead in example as teachers. Unfortunately, both Jews and Torah, and by default God, are often rejected primarily because people struggle to respect boundaries. Nevertheless, Scripture reveals one fine day the world, both Jew and Gentile, will adhere to Torah as discussed above. To read an article I wrote proving Noahide Laws are not the only laws Gentiles are to obey, click here.

Do you adhere to the teachings of Talmud or other Jewish writings?

While I certainly believe valuable insight can be gleaned from the Talmud and other Jewish writings, I don’t believe they are the inspired word of God to be considered on the same authoritative level of the Torah and the rest of the Tanakh. Nevertheless, insights shared in the Talmud and other sources can certainly be useful and valuable tools to ponder and apply.

Do you eat kosher?

My food choices are based off God’s instructions outlined in Leviticus 11, Deuteronomy 14, and Isaiah 65-66. What God defines as food, I define as food. What He defines as clean, I define as clean. I do not have a traditional kosher kitchen with separate dishwashers, refrigerators, or dishes exclusively for meat or dairy. I don’t have an issue with mixing meat with dairy so long as they are from clean animals. Such restrictions are interpretations various rabbis over the years documented in the Talmud.

As a female Jew-By-Choice, do you cover your hair or only wear skirts as Orthodox women do? What are your thoughts on female Jews wearing a kippah, tzitzits, or tefillin as some women do in liberal denominations of Judaism? Do you light Shabbat candles and do Havdalah?

Because I have not discovered commands in Torah instructing women to cover their hair, at this time, I do not feel obligated or compelled to do so, but I respect Jewish women as well as other women of faith for covering their hair in whatever form they see fit as an act of modesty and or worship. When I would pray publicly in Jewish worship services, I would cover my hair out of respect, but in my day-to-day operations, I don’t cover my hair. In regards to my dress code, I wear skirts, ladies slacks, ladies jeans, ladies t-shirts, ladies shoes (size 8 if you want to donate – haha), etc. I do not wear men’s clothing. I believe the command found in Deuteronomy 22:5 indicates God wants men to be distinctly male and women to be distinctly feminine as He created an individual to embrace and be His work of art, but I personally do not interpret this verse to mean women may only wear skirts/dresses always for in various cultures garments that look like skirts or dresses are also men’s garments. It’s about being distinctly female or male within your culture’s clothing options.

In regards to women wearing a kippah or teffilin as a form of expressing their faith, I am neither against it or for it, but understand why many, whether male or female, do wear such items as reminders of Who they serve. The only item that I can find in Torah as being instructed to wear as a visible and tangible reminder of God’s commands is the strings at the end of the four corners (Numbers 15:37-41), what is known today as tzitzits. Whether this applies to women as well I suppose depends on the interpretation of the text. The teffilin concept comes from the text of Deuteronomy 6:8 to bind God’s law as a sign on your hand and symbol on your forehead, which I interpret to mean to think about and obey Torah. Not to literally attempt to bind 613 commands to your forehead and right arm physically; although, the practice of teffilin dates back to 2nd Century BCE and has been an ongoing debate. At this time, in my faith journey and as a woman, I don’t wear a kippah, teffilin, or tzitzits, but respect those who do.

Even though lighting Shabbat candles just before/at the beginning of Shabbat or holding a Havdalah ceremony at the close of Shabbat are not commands in Torah, I do generally do such traditional rituals as a means to help me distinguish and keep Shabbat special. Lighting the candles helps me to remember to be the light. But if I don’t for whatever reason, I don’t chide myself for failing to do so as it is not an actual command, but just a meaningful reminder to rest when the world is busy and to be the light.

In summary, if God has an instruction recorded for us in Torah, then I strive to obey it willingly and diligently and have consequently, been blessed by it. However, if it is a Jewish custom or additional tradition not detailed in Torah, then I perceive it as optional. With that said, some commands can be difficult to understand how to fulfill so insight from the Talmud or other Jewish sources can be useful in discerning said Scriptures. More importantly, I don’t obey God’s instructions for life to get something from Him such as a blessing, rather, I obey to bless Him. In turn, I am blessed abundantly.

Do you celebrate Jewish holidays / feasts such as Pesach/Passover, Pentecost/Shavuot/Feast of Weeks, Feast of Tabernacles/Booths/Sukkot, and others?

Yes, I strive to celebrate the Feasts of the LORD detailed in various passages, but namely Leviticus 23 to the best of my ability as a woman while not living in the land of Israel. With that said, I do not stress about some of the additional rabbinic interpretations as to how a Lulav should be shook in various directions during Sukkot, as an example, but I do remove leaven from my home before Pesach as instructed by God, as another example. If it is detailed in Tanakh, I strive to obey it, if not, I don’t worry about it.

Note: Specific commands are for specific genders or roles such as priests as well as specific commands are for living in the land while others apply to those living outside of Israel; additionally, sacrifices, which are apart of the feasts according to Leviticus 23, can only be done in the land of Israel within the temple in Jerusalem, which currently does not exist (and no, sacrifices cannot be made in your backyard or campground. Haha!).

Liberal Judaism typically does not believe in prophecies such as a Messiah, the third temple, resuming sacrifices, the world adhering to Torah, etc., what is your position?

If it is written in the Tanakh, or what Christians would call the Old Testament, then I believe in it. I do believe a day will come when all Jews as well as the scattered, lost, Northern Kingdom, or ten tribes will all be not just resurrected, but regathered to the land of Israel one fine day (Ezekiel 36-37). I believe as Scripture foretells, there will be a third temple, animal and other sacrifices will once again be part of worship, God will pour out His spirit, all of Israel as well as surviving Gentiles will “learn righteousness” as Torah is dispensed and enforced (Isaiah 2, 11, 26, 51, 65-66; Zechariah 14; Ezekiel 36-48; Micah 4).

Additionally, I believe God’s presence will dwell in Jerusalem permanently while the resurrected David will be ruler of Israel. Unlike Orthodox Jews, I do not believe the numerous times prophecies in Scripture details “David” as being king/prince or shepherd that it is by default referring to someone in David’s lineage as I have yet to see a Scripture that prophesized a person’s name, but meant someone else or within someone’s lineage. For example, when the Prophet Isaiah foretold of a Gentile King named Cyrus would help restore the Jews back to Jerusalem and aid them in building another temple, history revealed it was an actual Gentile King named Cyrus who did exactly that not a descendant of someone named Cyrus. Similarly, when the Prophet Jeremiah prophesized of a specific place such as Babylon would take the Southern Kingdom captive should they not repent, it was precisely the Babylonian Empire that conquered the Southern Kingdom and took Jews captive to Babylon. Nor do I see examples of Scripture refraining from stating the lineage of someone such as Isaiah 2 says from the “rod (lineage) of Jesse” a ruler will manifest and Micah 5 proclaims that ruler “one whose origin is from of old, from ancient times” (David) will have been born in Bethlehem, which David was. When the prophets detail specific names of people or places or timelines, that is indeed what manifests so I do not perceive or await for a mysterious anointed messiah from the line of David, who also must be born in Bethlehem, and I certainly don’t believe Jesus is the Messiah, for I believe, Scripture repeatedly states literally the resurrected David will be ruler/shepherd of Israel (Jeremiah 30:9; Ezekiel 34:23-24; 37:24; Hosea 3:5), which fulfills God’s covenant with David. I suppose time will tell.

Note: Click here to read a detailed article with much Scripture revealing David will be “Messiah”. I did not pen this article, but found it insightful.

Christianity teaches all mankind is destined for hell when they die by default, but in order to be “saved” from eternal tormenting hell you must believe in Jesus as Messiah. Aren’t you worried you will go to hell when you die? And what is your perspective of the afterlife?

Christianity certainly declares people will perish in their sins and consequently go to hell unless they confess Jesus is their god, their savior, messiah, etc. How else are you going to fill pews? Christianity is easy to sell when you make people believe they’re going to hell – especially when it is something impossible to prove either way. Ironically, this concept of heaven or hell is largely read into the New Testament as Jesus Himself says no one has been to heaven in John 3:13 and Acts 2 indicates King David is still dead and buried not in heaven. But the New Testament does repeatedly teach about the concept of resurrection as does the Tanakh. The resurrection is actually the eternal life Jesus allegedly references not beaming one up to heaven when they die. In regards to what I believe now that I no longer worship Jesus, the Hebrew Bible, being the Tanakh, doesn’t say anything about when you die you go to hell or heaven. It does, however, indicate when one dies, whether righteous or wicked, they go to Sheol or the underworld like a holding tank awaiting the resurrection (Psalm 16:10, 30:4, 49:15; 1 Samuel 2:6; 2 Samuel 22; Jonah 2:2; Hosea 13:14). In fact, the Tanakh essentially says when you are dead, you are dead, your life-breath returns to God, but there is a hope in the resurrection (Psalm 49:6-16, 115:17; Ecclesiastes 7:1, 9:5, 12:7). Moreover, Scripture indicates at the end of the world as we know it, the world will be against Israel worse than ever before in human history (Daniel 12:1), which is difficult to imagine post-Holocaust. One particular verse in Daniel indicates Israel will be rescued, as in literally and physically saved from their oppressors, and all mankind will be resurrected and then judged based off their deeds (Daniel 12:2; Zechariah 12-14). Those who came against Israel will be doomed (Zechariah 14). Moreover, the Scriptures reveal an enormous earthquake, burning, and melting will occur as God essentially destroys the earth through that ordeal, but spares some Gentiles (those that didn’t come against Israel) and literally rescues Israel from their enemies. The House of Israel (the lost Northern Kingdom 10 tribes) as well as the House of Judah (the Southern Kingdom) will be resurrected if dead or regathered if alive and brought back to the land of Israel (Isaiah 25:8-9, 26:19, 35:8-10, 44:23, 51:11; Hosea 13:14; Ezekiel 37; Jeremiah 29-31; Psalm 49:6-16).  The world will be shocked to see the most hated people being Israel will be esteemed (Isaiah 26, 35, 52:13-15, 54-56,60-62; Jeremiah 29-31; Ezekiel 36-48; Joel 2-4; Zephaniah 1-3; Zechariah 8, 14).

Is your husband Jewish or anyone in your family? How have your loved ones responded to such a drastic change in your “flip-flopped” faith?

Neither my husband or anyone in my family is Jewish that I am aware of; however, I am a descendant of German Jews on both my mother and father’s side from numerous generations ago.

My husband has been OK with most of the transition he saw in my life such as resting on Sabbath, celebrating the feasts, but not celebrating pagan holidays like Halloween, Christmas, Easter, etc. The one issue he had with my “flip-flopped” faith was not eating bacon. For about a year or so, he was passive-aggressive about not eating pork, specifically bacon. Nearly every time we visited a family member or friend’s home, he would announce that “Carrie doesn’t eat pork!” and would do so eagerly even when food was not the topic at all. He was covertly trying to get different family members or friends to reprimand me for my new belief so he could eat bacon without feeling guilty. I, however, would express to him he can live as he sees fit, but I am choosing this path. I asked him to refrain from attempting to ostracize or humiliate me to justify his habits or food choices. Eventually, he stopped and rarely eats anything unclean now. He typically rests on Sabbath as well and supports me in my faith.

Thus far, most family members have been supportive – perhaps not over-joyed, but at least generally supportive and not confrontational about it. Only one or two have manifested some antisemitism and their disapproval, but it is not uncommon for those same family members to behave poorly should one set boundaries or express themselves – particularly if it is differently than their ideologies.

Evangelical Christians or the devout Christians, whether Protestant or Catholic, seem to have the hardest time accepting my “flip-flopped” faith. Many have been so deeply brainwashed without realizing it that it is hard for them to critically think or look at various passages without Christian filters or preconceived notions. Many have been conditioned to read into the text rather than letting the text interpret itself like any other book. Meanwhile other former Evangelical, “born again”, or “Spirit-led” and Catholic Christians have traversed a similar path and ultimately came to the same conclusions as I have. It has been neat to see testimonies on YouTube of former Christians, even Pastors and Bible teachers, also abstaining from idolatry and turning to the One True God.

Most people, whether family, friends, or coworkers, respect my faith and I respect theirs. Healthy people can respect others while not sacrificing their own lifestyle choices. It is interesting to connect the boundaries God has established to help us relate to Him and others while recognizing unhealthy people hate boundaries set by God or others.

Also, when one person strives to walk in God’s ways, can easily debunk typical Christian doctrine, and is happy and blessed while doing so, it challenges the faith of others. Usually when people manifest in disapproval or hostility it is because they are feeling threatened and or convicted, but hopefully, they will investigate newly introduced concepts for themselves. Regardless, I choose to serve the One True Living God, be His light, a keeper and teacher of Torah.

For Unto Us Jesus Is Born? Understanding Isaiah 9:6

The famous verse of Isaiah 9:6 is circulated and exclaimed in Christmas services worldwide, as many Christians, and likely even non-Christians, know. But what I didn’t know as a former Christian and likely many of my friends/family also don’t know is a few eye-opening truths about this particular “Christmas verse”.

1) Isaiah 9:6 was altered in translation from the Hebrew to English to make it sound like the prophet Isaiah was speaking of a FUTURE person (like 700+ years in the future), which Christianity uses to proclaim Jesus is the Messiah, when in fact the verbs in Hebrew throughout the verse are PAST tense or indicating an unfolding matter. In other words, this verse is not about Jesus, but more accurately a person in Isaiah’s time.

Most Christians don’t have Hebrew Bibles, read Hebrew, or speak it let alone understand the depths of Hebrew like Rabbis do and many Jews do for they are raised early on to read it, speak it, study it. Naturally, the average person reading the translations put much trust in the translator(s). Hence, why I am slowly learning to read Hebrew for myself, though daunting.

2) Many don’t recognize the significance of Hebrew names and that it is common to refer to God or an attribute of His within the Hebrew name while not labeling that person as God Himself for that would be blasphemous and against concepts throughout Torah. So most Christians don’t realize the phrases like “wonderful counselor”, “prince of peace”, “mighty/strength of God”, etc. are the translations of Hebrew name meanings. In general, Judaism believes this verse of Isaiah 9:5/6 is describing Hezekiah, Ahaz’s son, when one reads/studies Hebrew and in context. Apparently, even some Christian commentators agree with Jewish sages on the meaning of this verse being about Hezekiah, not Jesus. Moreover, names throughout the Hebrew can and often do have prophetic, or at the very least, hopeful implications connected to that child and/or his/her descendants. For example, in Isaiah 8:1-4, the chapter before the infamous Christmas verse, Isaiah’s wife gets pregnant and they name the child to capture a hopeful, future event WITHIN that child’s lifetime – according to those verses. What is interesting is in Isaiah 7:10-17, a chapter earlier, King Ahaz reluctantly asks for a sign to help know God’s will, per the LORD’s prompting. The prophet Isaiah informs the skeptical king that a pregnant woman, likely a wife or concubine of King Ahaz’s when you consider he says “Look” indicating the young woman is present and uses present tense verbs stating she “is” with child and about to give birth. The Prophet Isaiah tells King Ahaz that baby or pregnant woman is the sign of hope and direction King Ahaz needs. Was that baby the future King Hezekiah? Highly likely. Hence, the eloquent and lengthy description of what was about to unfold for the Northern Kingdom/House of Israel/Ephraim the Southern Kingdom/House of Judah when Assyria, who God uses as His rod of anger/discipline (Isaiah 10:5) approaches, and the description of King Hezekiah (Ahaz’s son) in Isaiah 9:6 (vs 5 in Jewish Bible). Hezekiah means strength/mighty God. Over a few decades, Assyria invaded Israel, but thanks to King Hezekiah’s leadership as a wonderful counselor, ruler of peace, and strength of God in him, etc.(2 Kings 18-20), Assyria failed to conquer Jerusalem and the House of Judah (the Southern Kingdom), but did take the Northern Kingdom and those 10 tribes of Israel eventually assimilated into the nations, lost. Even more interesting is how God used yet another pregnant woman, being Isaiah’s pregnant wife, their unborn son, as a confirmation to Ahaz’s sign in the following verses of Isaiah 8. Neither of those pregnant women’s unborn babies was God Himself, nor foretell of God “in the flesh”, for that is against God’s own instructions in Torah, but rather, both of those pregnancies conveyed the reassurance that the tribe of Judah/House of Judah/Southern Kingdom need not fear, God is with them. For as the prophet Jeremiah reiterated later during the Babylonian captivity of Judah, God always has (and still has) hope and a future for Jews/Israel (Jeremiah 29:10) even when things look bleak. The prophet Zechariah in Zechariah 8 also predicts, in the end of it all, Gentiles will flock to Jews realizing God indeed is still with them.

Such things among many others I discovered when trying to prove Jesus is the Messiah using only Hebrew Scriptures. Shockingly, while studying and wrestling with God, I discovered the heartbreaking opposite as the “messianic prophecies” allegedly linked to Jesus could rather easily be debunked. Moreover, in addition to discovering I was misled, albeit unintentionally, I, like many Christians, are grossly guilty of reading into the “old” testament (Just labeling it “old” is clever, isn’t it? Implying it is irrelevant and replaceable just like “the church” is allegedly the new and improved Israel) what we want it to mean rather than letting the text interpret itself as well as actually studying the many layers of Hebrew not to mention the numerous wise sages who spent lifetimes studying such things. Even more disturbing was discovering how many pagan gods have a similar storyline as Jesus (i.e. virgin birth, celebrated on Dec 25, or died and was resurrected, etc.) as well as learning the gospels, where we get the largely fictional accounts of Jesus, were written decades after Jesus lived and died by unknown authors- all after Paul mysteriously sees some vision in the sky similar to Emperor Constantine’s vision in the sky who really went and turned faith of Jesus into an entirely antisemitic beast.

Needless to say, 2020 was a very eye-opening year as I discovered much truth and still am learning more! Many tears were shed I will tell you that much, but once I accepted these harsh realities, the truth set me free. I will attach some articles and videos for anyone interested to investigate for themselves. In all sincerity, for the love of God, I pray more take off the Christian glasses we’ve been prescribed for in doing so, much comes into focus. 2020.

Isaiah 9:6

https://jewsforjudaism.org/knowledge/articles/can-you-give-a-reason-why-jews-say-isaiah-96-does-not-refer-to-jesus

Are the 7 Noahide Laws the Only Commands Gentiles Should Obey?

Both Judaism and Christianity typically teach that G!d’s 613 commands are exclusively for Jews to obey while Gentiles are only obligated to obey general moral laws such as the “Seven Noahide Laws”. For those unfamiliar with the 7 Noahide Laws, they are as follows:

1) Don’t worship any other god, but the One True Living G!d (no idols);

2) Don’t curse G!d;

3) Don’t commit murder/bloodshed;

4) Don’t steal;

5) Don’t commit sexual immorality;

6) Establish a judicial system;

7) Don’t eat the limb/flesh of a living animal.

Some of these principles are established by Noah as instructions to his sons after the family and animals exited the ark upon being the sole survivors of the great flood in Genesis 9 while other alleged laws are assumed. In this chapter of the Bible thought to be the basis for the Noahide Laws, Noah urges his sons and their wives to be fruitful and multiply (Gen. 9:1,7) as did G!d to Adam and Eve; Noah also informed his sons that the animals, the birds, and fish would be fearful of man, but man has dominion over them all (vs. 2); they can’t eat meat rare (with blood in it – vs. 3); and, lastly, they can’t murder or cause blood to be shed (vs. 5-6). If we were to go strictly by Genesis 9 alone, then, technically, these four commands would be the Noahide Laws. The Jewish sages expanded on them some to establish the seven, and various sects of Christianity have their own set of laws as well.

It is my position that while these Noahide laws are a great place to start, there appear to be hints of other laws Gentiles could obey and Gentiles of the future will obey. Moreover, whether Jew or Gentile, one ought to obey G!d’s commands, not suggestions, to the best of their ability and understanding out of their love for G!d. If one devotes their time finding excuses or develops arguments against obeying G!d’s commands, therein reveals much, namely one’s heart and alleged reverence for G!d and His authority in their life.

In the Summer of 2020, my Gentile husband and I visited the Ark replication in Kentucky.

With that said, let us look at a few examples of Gentiles obeying what many would consider exclusive Jewish laws or laws not listed in the Seven Noahide Laws.

Sacrifices

First, consider neither Adam, Eve, their sons, nor even Noah were Jewish for the tribes of Israel and therefore, the tribe of Judah, had not existed at this point in the Genesis story, and yet, G!d evidently commanded or, at the very least, welcomed the first family to offer sacrifices to Him. Hence, the first case of domestic violence and homicide, sadly, as Cain was jealous of Abel’s sacrifice (Genesis 4). Second, notice Noah understood the importance of sacrifices as he too offered sacrifices as soon as the flood was over (Genesis 8:20-22). Noah also made sure there were clean and unclean animals on the ark presumably for the purpose of making sacrifices and food (Genesis 7:2,8), instructions not yet documented until much later (Leviticus 1-7, 11). Likewise, many years post-flood, Abraham, who also was not technically Jewish, fashioned an altar to worship G!d (Genesis 12:7; 13:4,18); although the text does not specifically say he also offered sacrifices, it is inferred. Later, when Abraham’s son, Isaac, was older, G!d tested Abraham’s devotion to G!d by instructing him to, you could say, lay his idol down as Abraham set out to sacrifice his son as a burnt offering on an altar. Abraham trusted G!d would provide a better alternative while demonstrating he loved G!d even more than his miracle-baby. Consequently, G!d indeed had a better plan and provided a clean animal instead of Isaac (see Genesis 22). Again, all of this took place well before Jews and Judaism existed or G!d’s commands were documented by Moses.

As another example of Gentiles making sacrifices, in the future, after God physically rescues, regathers, and resurrects the scattered tribes of Israel and reigns on Earth (Zechariah 9-14), the surviving Gentile nations will be required to participate in making sacrifices for the Feast of Tabernacles, or Sukkot in Hebrew, according to Zechariah 14:16-21. Did you catch that? It will be required of Gentiles by G!d Himself to sacrifice in the future – for Sukkot / Feast of Tabernacles for certain! In that same time period, a temple will exist, according to the prophet Ezekiel in Ezekiel 37-47 so evidently, Gentiles that survive the Battle of Gog & Magog will be bringing sacrifices to Jerusalem for the Feast of Tabernacles, also known as Sukkot, or Feast of Booths or Feast of Ingathering.

It should be noted that Noah offered sacrifices of praise upon his literal, physical salvation (Genesis 8:20-22) just as the future surviving Gentiles will do upon their literal, physical salvation (Zechariah 14). Likewise, Noah and the other family that survived the flood repopulated the renewed Earth just as the future surviving Gentiles will do.

Sabbath and Other Holy Days

In the previous segment about sacrifices, we briefly explored the Feasts of Tabernacles, a Feast of the LORD, and how it will be celebrated in the World-To-Come, or upon G!d creating the New Heavens and New Earth, in the New Covenant not yet activated. In Isaiah 66:22-24, we also see the seventh-day Sabbath and the monthly new moon celebrations (Rosh Chodesh) will be observed by “all flesh”, meaning all mankind. The Prophet Ezekiel also predicts during that era G!d’s Sabbaths and Feasts are obeyed as well as sacrifices by the reunited and resurrected twelve tribes of Israel (see Ezekiel 43-44). It would appear in the future because all of the once scattered Israelites will be fully restored in the Promised Land of Canaan (Israel), G!d’s laws will also be fully restored while Gentiles obey some additional laws such as the Sabbath and celebrate Sukkot.

Notice the passage says “all flesh”, not just Jews.

Fasting

Fasting is another command not found in the Seven Noahide Laws and yet the Prophet Jonah instructs the Gentiles of Nineveh to fast as a means to demonstrate their repentance. Fasting is a central part of Judaism, particularly on the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), one of G!d’s Holy Days found in Leviticus 23, and all about repentance. Apparently, G!d appreciates the Gentile that fasts as a sign of repentance as well.

Lying

Technically, lying is not one of the Seven Noahide Laws either, but according to Nahum 3:1, the Ninevites (see Nahum 1:1), the ones who fasted and repented as mentioned above, were sinning by lying. In other words, lying was one of the offenses that caused G!d to send a prophet announcing G!d’s disapproval of their behavior and their need to repent to be spared from G!d’s wrath.

Sorcery

Likewise, sorcery was another command the Ninevites evidently violated, according to Nahum 3:4, and yet, is not listed in the Seven-To-Heaven list, or list that deems a Gentile righteous if obeyed according to the traditions of Judaism. Sorcery isn’t even in the 10 Commandments and yet clearly, a no-no, for both Jew and Gentile (Micah 5:11-14).

Unclean Food: No Bacon For You!

The vague translations of Genesis 9 make it sound like Noah’s sons can eat anything, but just the fact that Noah brings both unclean and clean animals on board the ark indicates otherwise. G!d specifically informed Moses much later what is food and not food in both Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14 for Israelites, but it is interesting Noah understood what animals are clean and unclean before G!d gave Moses such instructions inferring the knowledge of what G!d defines as food predated the covenant given at Mt Sinai.

Clearly, G!d reveals throughout various Scriptures, albeit after carefully studying, that the Seven Noahide Laws may be a great place for Gentiles to start obeying G!d, but Gentiles should at the very least expect some more in the future (ie. Sukkot sacrifices & Sabbath). Moreover, consider the simple fact that Jews are “chosen” to be the light to the nations (Isaiah 42:6; 49:6) designed to teach the light, being Torah or God’s commands, and all its wisdom and glory to the deceived world (Proverbs 6:23; Psalm 119:18,105-106; Ezekiel 44:23-24; Jeremiah 16:19; Zechariah 8). We also can learn throughout the passages of the prophetic books in the Hebrew Bible, in the future, everyone will know who G!d is and what He expects (Jeremiah 31) – it will be a time when the whole world, will “learn righteousness” (Isaiah 26:8-10) meaning Torah, God’s definition of light, His instructions on how to be the light, life, and love. Torah will be taught to the nations and consequently, there will be world peace (see Isaiah 2 and Micah 4).

Moreover, whether Jew or Gentile, everyone has specific responsibilities and purpose then, now, and in the future.

In conclusion, in addition to the benefits of learning Torah, it is apparent to me if certain commands were observed by Gentiles before the tribes of Israel were even established and some of the said commands will be observed by the world after all the tribes of Israel are reunited and re-established in the future, then obviously, they are neither done away with, as Christianity teaches, nor only 7 laws for Gentiles as traditional Judaism teaches. Therefore, I do not believe the 7 Noahide Laws are the only commands Gentiles should obey, but rather, it could be a good place to start.

“For this applies to all mankind..”

Fear God, Not Ghosts

The craze to dress up like ghosts, goblins, or some other ghoulish costume continues to haunt Americans, including God-fearing Christians and Jews alike. The lucrative 9 Million Dollar American industry tempts even the religious to celebrate the most evil time of the year. What’s more frightening is many, if not most Americans, are unaware the origins of this spooky holiday, much less what the Hebrew and Christian Bibles say about ghosts or more specifically talking to ghosts.

According to numerous credible internet sources, Halloween essentially originated and still is considered a pagan holiday known as the most ideal day to speak to the dead and as a bonus, the dead may even predict the future for you. Even more fascinating is the Torah, the first five books of both the Hebrew and Christian Bibles, specifically warn against speaking to the dead either on one’s own or through a medium, particularly to learn of the future (Exodus 22:17, Leviticus 19:30-31, 20:6, 27; Deuteronomy 18:11). The prophet Isaiah also warns not to do so in Isaiah 8:19-20 and 29:4. Just the fact that God states not to converse with the dead indicates it IS possible to do; otherwise, a command stating not to do so would not be needed. It also infers pagans have been communicating with the dead for thousands of years.

In this painting, King Saul falls prostrate upon seeing the ghost of the Prophet Samuel.

In fact, did you know there is a fascinating story found in 1 Samuel 28:7-25 where King Saul seeks out a witch or medium to contact the deceased Prophet Samuel to get advice about what to do about a pending battle? In this story, not only does King Saul break both God’s and his own law banishing mediums or any other form of witchcraft and sorcery, but the medium is successful in summoning the peacefully rested Samuel. The medium is shocked to see the ghost of Samuel for it is then she realizes King Saul is in costume and deceived her in who he is (since he banished such practices) so the medium is worried he will have her killed (see 1 Sam. 28:8 -12). Meanwhile, the ghost of the Prophet Samuel is irate he was disturbed from his soul-sleep, if you will (vs 15).

As if all that wasn’t remarkable enough, the Prophet Samuel can STILL prophesize to King Saul WHILE DEAD (vs 19)! Prophet Samuel predicts King Saul will be joining him in death the next day along with King Saul’s descendants.

What we can learn from this Biblical account are a few things:

  1. Whether you a righteous person or a wicked person, it appears, when you are dead, you are dead (Ecclesiastes 9:5) as if asleep blissfully unaware of your surroundings as you await the resurrection (Job 14:10-14; Daniel 12:1-3; Ezekiel 36-37; Jeremiah 29-31) and not instantly ushered to “heaven” or “hell” – even the New Testament makes such claims (see John 3:13; Acts 2:29), rather God’s breath in you goes back to God (Ecclesiastes 12:7) but I realize, Christianity is an easy sell when you make people believe they are going to hell – Moreover, what is the point of a resurrection or God reigning on earth one day if you are instantly with God upon death?;
  2. The dead’s spirit or ghost can be disturbed and communicated with (though not advised!);
  3. Some mediums do indeed have a gift or craft for summoning the dead, though it is against God’s instructions to do so;
  4. The dead’s spirit or ghost can inform you of things you’d shouldn’t know about or ask about (i.e. like when you are going to die or what tomorrow holds);
  5. And evidently, prophets can still prophesize even when dead (funny, not funny)!

Being I have seen a ghost and even have regrettably communicated with a ghost once (before knowing it was against Torah many, many years ago now), as well as been on ghost tours through historic cities, and so forth, I have come to believe ghosts indeed exists, but have pondered the mystery as to why one may not speak to ghosts – what’s the harm? And what’s the harm in dressing up like ghosts as is the custom in Halloween? I have come to the conclusion that though it is certainly possible to contact the dead for whatever reason, perhaps for advice or longing for relationship or just to know you are indeed sensing something paranormal in your home and not crazy (such as was my case years ago), The One True Living God wants us to seek Him instead for said matters, not the dead. Furthermore, it would seem once you open that door, it is difficult to tightly close. It’s like the stray alley cat you feed, they are likely to tell the other cats, there is a crazy cat lady who will feed and entertain you. Likewise, it’s been my observation, if you are willing to communicate with one ghost, others also attempt to communicate perhaps longing to resolve issues left undone. Moreover, if there is a Holy Ghost or Spirit of Holiness, however, you want to label God’s Spirit, then that would indicate there also are unholy ghosts or evil spirits. Otherwise, the adjective of “holy” would not be needed to distinguish that Spirit from other spirits. Perhaps just like there are righteous and evil people, there too are good ghosts and bad ghosts, angels, and demons. The problem is both angels and demons are allegedly all around as are possibly the dead, so who do we know for certain we are talking to when consulting the dead or when a medium is communicating with them on our behalf? How do you know you are talking to Aunt Betty or some struggling ghost needing closure and not a demon in disguise? How do you know you or your kid’s costume doesn’t attract some deceptive or confused spirit and your kid isn’t bringing home more than just candy? Again, The Living God implores us not to take such harmful risks, but rather instructs the living to seek the Living God for guidance. He has kindly ensured everything we need to know has been documented for us. Also, know that He still speaks to our minds and still answers prayers. All we need to do is seek Him and verify it is Him through His documented Voice found in the Bible.

Most importantly, fear God, keep His instructions for life, and do not fear, talk to, or emulate ghosts. Halloween glorifies and invites death, breaking God’s commands such as murder or casting spells, while propagating unholy fear, and communicating with the dead. What do you want to teach your kids and grandkids: Fearing God or fearing ghosts? We don’t need to fear ghosts, just God.